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Friday, April 3, 2015

Personal Insolvency Manual

INSOLVENCY MANUAL - REVENUE IRELAND

20 Common Phrases Even The Smartest People Misuse!

When you hear someone using grammar incorrectly, do you make an assumption about his or her intelligence or education? There’s no doubt that words are powerful things that can leave a lasting impression on those with whom you interact.

1. Prostrate Cancer
It’s an easy misspelling to make—just add an extra r and “prostate cancer” becomes “prostrate cancer,” which suggests “a cancer of lying face-down on the ground.” Both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Mayo Clinic websites include this misspelling.

2. First-Come, First-Serve
This suggests that the first person to arrive has to serve all who follow. The actual phrase is “first-come, first-served,” to indicate that the participants will be served in the order in which they arrive. Both Harvard and Yale got this one wrong.

3. Sneak Peak
A “peak” is a mountain top. A “peek” is a quick look. The correct expression is “sneak peek,” meaning a secret or early look at something. This error appeared on Oxford University’s site as well as that of the National Park Service.

4. Deep-Seeded
This should be “deep-seated,” to indicate that something is firmly established. Though “deep-seeded” might seem to make sense, indicating that something is planted deep in the ground, this is not the correct expression. Correctica found this error on the Washington Post and the White House websites.

5. Extract Revenge
To “extract” something is to remove it, like a tooth. The correct expression is “exact revenge,” meaning to achieve revenge. Both The New York Times and the BBC have made this error.

6. I Could Care Less
“I couldn't care less” is what you would say to express maximum apathy toward a situation. Basically you’re saying, “It’s impossible for me to care less about this because I have no more care to give. I've run out of care.” Using the incorrect “I could care less” indicates that “I still have care left to give—would you like some?”

7. Shoe-In
“Shoo-in” is a common idiom that means a sure winner. To “shoo” something is to urge it in a direction. As you would shoo a fly out of your house, you could also shoo someone toward victory. The expression started in the early 20th century, relating to horse racing and broadened to politics soon after. It’s easy to see why the “shoe-in” version is so common, as it suggests the door-to-door sales practice of moving a foot into the doorway to make it more difficult for a prospective client to close the door. But “foot in the door” is an entirely different idiom.

8. Emigrated To
With this one there is no debate. The verb “emigrate” is always used with the preposition “from,” whereas immigrate is always used with the preposition “to.” To emigrate is to come from somewhere, and to immigrate is to go to somewhere. “Jimmy emigrated from Ireland to the United States” means the same thing as “Jimmy immigrated to the United States from Ireland.” It’s just a matter of what you’re emphasizing—the coming or the going.

9. Slight of Hand
“Sleight of hand” is a common phrase in the world of magic and illusion, because “sleight” means dexterity or cunning, usually to deceive. On the other hand, as a noun, a “slight” is an insult.

10. Honed In
First, it’s important to note that this particular expression is hotly debated. Many references now consider “hone in” a proper alternate version of “home in.” That said, it is still generally accepted that “home in” is the more correct phrase. To home in on something means to move toward a goal, such as “The missile homed in on its target.” To “hone” means to sharpen. You would say, “I honed my résumé writing skills.” But you would likely not say, “The missile honed in on its target.” When followed by the preposition “in,” the word “hone” just doesn’t make sense.

11. Baited Breath
The term “bated” is an adjective meaning suspense. It originated from the verb “abate,” meaning to stop or lessen. Therefore, “to wait with bated breath” essentially means to hold your breath with anticipation. The verb “bait,” on the other hand, means to taunt, often to taunt a predator with its prey. A fisherman baits his line in hopes of a big catch. Considering the meaning of the two words, it’s clear which is correct, but the word “bated” is mostly obsolete today, leading to ever-increasing mistakes in this expression.

12. Piece of Mind
This should be “peace” of mind, meaning calmness and tranquility. The expression “piece of mind” actually would suggest doling out sections of brain.

13. Wet Your Appetite
This expression is more often used incorrectly than correctly—56% of the time it appears online, it’s wrong. The correct idiom is “whet your appetite.” “Whet” means to sharpen or stimulate, so to “whet your appetite” means to awaken your desire for something.

14. For All Intensive Purposes
The correct phrase is “for all intents and purposes.” It originates from English law dating back to the 1500s, which used the phrase “to all intents, constructions, and purposes” to mean “officially” or “effectively.”

15. One in the Same
“One in the same” would literally mean that the “one” is inside the same thing as itself, which makes no sense at all. The proper phrase is “one and the same,” meaning the same thing or the same person. For example, “When Melissa was home schooled, her teacher and her mother were one and the same.”

16. Make Due
When something is due, it is owed. To “make due” would mean to “make owed,” but the phrase to “make do” is short for “to make something do well” or “to make something sufficient.” When life gives you lemons, you make do and make lemonade.

17. By in Large
The phrase “by and large” was first used in 1706 to mean “in general.” It was a nautical phrase derived from the sailing terms “by” and “large.” While it doesn’t have a literal meaning that makes sense, “by and large” is the correct version of this phrase.

18. Do Diligence
While it may be easy to surmise that “do diligence” translates to doing something diligently, it does not. “Due diligence” is a business and legal term that means you will investigate a person or business before signing a contract with them or before formally engaging in a business deal together. You should do your due diligence and investigate business deals fully before committing to them.

19. Peaked My Interest
To “pique” means to arouse, so the correct phrase here is “piqued my interest,” meaning that my interest was awakened. To say that something “peaked my interest” might suggest that my interest was taken to the highest possible level, but this is not what the idiom is meant to convey.

20. Case and Point
The correct phrase in this case is “case in point,” which derives its meaning from a dialect of Old French. While it may not make any logical sense today, it is a fixed idiom.
 

CPD Notes Legal Research

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CPD NOTES LEGAL RESEARCH

Thursday, April 2, 2015

25 Inspiring Quotes From the World's Most Successful Billionaires

Success is a lousy teacher. It seduces smart people into thinking they can’t lose.” —Bill Gates

“You know, once you’ve stood up to cancer, everything else feels like a pretty easy fight.” —David Koch

“I learned from my dad that change and experimentation are constants and important. You have to keep trying new things.” —S. Robson Walton

“Once we realize that imperfect understanding is the human condition, there is no shame in being wrong, only in failing to correct our mistakes.” —George Soros

“To do what you wanna do, to leave a mark—in a way that you think is important and lasting—that’s a life well-lived.” —Laurene Powell Jobs

“America, for me, is the country where, if you have something great to offer, you’ll be valued highly.” —Tadashi Yanai

“Vision is perhaps our greatest strength...it has kept us alive to the power and continuity of thought through the centuries, it makes us peer into the future and lends shape to the unknown.” —Li Ka-shing

“If you’re changing the world, you’re working on important things. You’re excited to get up in the morning.” —Larry Page

“I don’t like paying taxes, but I like sleeping at night.” —Leonardo Del Vecchio

“It’s better to hang out with people better than you. Pick out associates whose behavior is better than yours, and you’ll drift in that direction.” —Warren Buffett

“There is an immutable conflict at work in life and in business, a constant battle between peace and chaos. Neither can be mastered, but both can be influenced. How you go about that is the key to success.” —Phil Knight
“I enjoy the hunt much more than the good life after the victory.” —Carl Icahn

“I think frugality drives innovation, just like other constraints do. One of the only ways to get out of a tight box is to invent your way out.” —Jeff Bezos

“One of the great responsibilities that I have is to manage my assets wisely, so that they create value.” —Alice Walton

“When you deal with change, you have a couple choices: You can lead it and make the rules, or you can be a fast follower, or you can be a slow follower.” —Charles Ergen

“All of us, in a sense, struggle continuously all the time, because we never get what we want. The important thing which I’ve really learned is, how do you not give up, because you never succeed in the first attempt.” —Mukesh Ambaniz

“Don’t ally your personal interests with the development of the company.” —Wang Jianlin

“The biggest risk is not taking any risk.... In a world that’s changing really quickly, the only strategy that is guaranteed to fail is not taking risks.” —Mark Zuckerberg

“Great companies, in the way they work, start with great leaders.” —Steve Ballmer

“I have had all of the disadvantages required for success.” —Larry Ellison

“When you are on the management side, you still have to understand the artistic sensibility so that there is a dialogue with the creative side.” —Bernard Arnault

“Obviously everyone wants to be successful, but I want to be looked back on as being very innovative, very trusted and ethical, and ultimately making a big difference in the world.” —Sergey Brin

“And because no matter who you are, if you believe in yourself and your dream, New York will always be the place for you.” —Michael Bloomberg

“Help young people. Help small guys. Because small guys will be big. Young people will have the seeds you bury in their minds, and when they grow up, they will change the world.” —Jack Ma

“The three short years I spent at Harvard, where I lived with excellent people, taught me not only that I must know how to choose my partners but also that choosing excellent partners is a skill you can learn. Obviously, when you spend time with the best, you learn how to choose among them.” —Jorge Paulo Lemann

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Booking on Futurepoint using a discount voucher

Here is the simple five step method explained in screen grabs.

Step one -  click the book here button to open booking page. This ticket price option appears half way down page..





Step two - choose the ticket you wish to buy and enter quantity




Step three - You will then proceed to click " Add a discount code" above the continue bar.
Enter the discount code and press " Apply"


Step four - the new price including the value of the discount will now appear. You are now ready to continue. Press continue to make payment.



Step five - You may now make your payment by adding your name, email, and card details. 





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